And how to teach about it

I'm a 27-year-old, second year science teacher. I love my students more than any of them will probably ever know because I suck at emotions and letting people in. The thoughts, feelings, and opinions expressed on this blog are mine and in no way represent my employer.

 

standwithpalestine:

Israel puts on a show for the world’s media by reminding them over and over again how they tell Palestinian civilians to “evacuate” (which is an insult in itself since they’re not allowed to leave Gaza due to the illegal blockade), but the reality on the ground is that they tell Palestinians ‘we will kill you no matter where you go - you are our targets’ by bombing all the places they’re taking shelter in - ambulances, hospitals and UN schools.

(Source: standwithpalestine)

I am excited to see a generation of women who will raise their boys to be good rather than their girls to be scared.

thepeoplesrecord:

Here is a short list of a few of the hundreds of examples of the media intentionally manipulating the public to support Israel’s recent offensive against Palestinians
July 24, 2014

Please reblog or message with additions as you see/think of them and I will edit with the additions. I am sure we can create quite a large list of examples.

In 2003, Charlan Nemeth, a professor of psychology at the University of California at Berkeley, divided two hundred and sixty-five female undergraduates into teams of five. She gave all the teams the same problem—“How can traffic congestion be reduced in the San Francisco Bay Area?”—and assigned each team one of three conditions. The first set of teams got the standard brainstorming spiel, including the no-criticism ground rules. Other teams—assigned what Nemeth called the “debate” condition—were told, “Most research and advice suggest that the best way to come up with good solutions is to come up with many solutions. Freewheeling is welcome; don’t be afraid to say anything that comes to mind. However, in addition, most studies suggest that you should debate and even criticize each other’s ideas.” The rest received no further instructions, leaving them free to collaborate however they wanted. All the teams had twenty minutes to come up with as many good solutions as possible.

The results were telling. The brainstorming groups slightly outperformed the groups given no instructions, but teams given the debate condition were the most creative by far. On average, they generated nearly twenty per cent more ideas. And, after the teams disbanded, another interesting result became apparent. Researchers asked each subject individually if she had any more ideas about traffic. The brainstormers and the people given no guidelines produced an average of three additional ideas; the debaters produced seven.

Nemeth’s studies suggest that the ineffectiveness of brainstorming stems from the very thing that Osborn thought was most important. As Nemeth puts it, “While the instruction ‘Do not criticize’ is often cited as the important instruction in brainstorming, this appears to be a counterproductive strategy. Our findings show that debate and criticism do not inhibit ideas but, rather, stimulate them relative to every other condition.” Osborn thought that imagination is inhibited by the merest hint of criticism, but Nemeth’s work and a number of other studies have demonstrated that it can thrive on conflict.

Groupthink: the Brainstorming Myth" by Jonah Lehrer [The New Yorker]

Now that is stupid interesting..

(via hithertokt)