I'm a 27-year-old, third year science teacher. I love my students more than any of them will probably ever know because I suck at emotions and letting people in. The thoughts, feelings, and opinions expressed on this blog are mine and in no way represent my employer.

 

Money can buy

ragingpeacock:

  • Independence and safety (not having to rely on abusive ppl, getting to control how you spend your time and money)
  • Experiences (travel, events, vacations, entertainment)
  • Health (medical care duh, good food, good location, reduced stress)
  • Opportunity (car, being able to move, having a safety net, “looking professional”)
  • Confidence (clothes that make you look good, things that make you feel good)

iunno that seems a lot like happiness

bosxe:

perfectvic:

LITERALLY MY FAVORITE

This is so much better than any russian roulette or “poison cookie” analogy.

bosxe:

perfectvic:

LITERALLY MY FAVORITE

This is so much better than any russian roulette or “poison cookie” analogy.

(Source: punkypunk)

Has anyone else noticed that February 2015 is the perfect month?

strangenewclassrooms:

muirin007:

themaskednegro:

image

I actually let out a pleased little squeak when I saw this because ohhh man, that is beautiful.

February is the best month

Not only is it the perfect month, but my birthday’s on a Friday for the first time since 2009!

The most selfless thing I’ve done was fight the urge to ask you to stay.

Connotativewords | jl | Self-Control (via unabashinglyme)

(Source: connotativewords)

wornoutfavorite:

worldofthecutestcuties:

Someone at the Wisconsin Humane Society is really good at naming cats.


I think I’ve reblogged this before but does it look like I care?

wornoutfavorite:

worldofthecutestcuties:

Someone at the Wisconsin Humane Society is really good at naming cats.

I think I’ve reblogged this before but does it look like I care?

edukaition:

maptitude1:

This image from an excellent NYT interactive map shows where residents of each US state were born (as of 2012).

So if I’m reading this right, Michigan is the second highest state in terms of people staying in the state where they were born. Interesting.

I feel like there’s a lot more to this map than they’re really saying.  There has to be something said about the mobility- ease of and ability to move (IMO)- of a population when you look at the states.  Where are the jobs?  What about the marketability of the state makes people move there from other places?  Florida has an extremely high percentage of people born elsewhere, for example.  It would be interesting to couple this with surveys about why people choose to stay or leave to see if they stay by choice or feel trapped where they are.  We might even find that a low percentage of people move into a state because it’s not desirable to be there.

edukaition:

maptitude1:

This image from an excellent NYT interactive map shows where residents of each US state were born (as of 2012).

So if I’m reading this right, Michigan is the second highest state in terms of people staying in the state where they were born. Interesting.

I feel like there’s a lot more to this map than they’re really saying. There has to be something said about the mobility- ease of and ability to move (IMO)- of a population when you look at the states. Where are the jobs? What about the marketability of the state makes people move there from other places? Florida has an extremely high percentage of people born elsewhere, for example.
It would be interesting to couple this with surveys about why people choose to stay or leave to see if they stay by choice or feel trapped where they are. We might even find that a low percentage of people move into a state because it’s not desirable to be there.